What Is Case Study In Personal Development?

What Is Case Study In Personal Development
How to Write a Case Study – There are a variety of approaches that may be utilized in the process of carrying out a case study. Some of these approaches include prospective and retrospective case study approaches. Methods of prospective case studies are those in which an individual or group of persons are watched with the purpose of determining the results of the research.

For the purpose of tracking the development of a specific illness over a considerable amount of time, for instance, a sample population may be monitored throughout the course of a long length of time. Examining material from the past is an integral part of the retrospective case study methodology.

For instance, researchers may start with a result, such as a sickness, and then work their way backward to look at information about the individual’s life in order to find risk factors that may have contributed to the beginning of the illness.

What is a personal case study?

Study of a Case: – An in-depth examination of a single individual, organization, or event is referred to as a case study. In a case study, virtually every facet of the subject’s life and history is dissected in an effort to identify recurring themes and the factors that underlie their actions.

  • Case studies have applications in a wide range of disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, education, psychology, medicine, political science, and even social work;
  • The goal of a case study is to amass as much information as possible about an individual or group so that the results of the research may be applied to a large number of other situations;

Unfortunately, case studies have a propensity to be extremely subjective, and it can be challenging to generalize results to a wider population because of this tendency. Although they concentrate on a single person or group, case studies are written in a structure that is comparable to that of other genres of psychological writing.

What is the meaning of case study example?

What exactly is it? Case studies are a type of research approach that are most frequently utilized in the fields of social sciences and biological sciences. Case study research may be defined in a number of different ways. 1 Having said that, very briefly.

  1. According to one definition, a case study is “an extensive study on a person, a group of individuals, or a unit, the purpose of which is to generalize over numerous units.” 1 A case study is another name for a thorough and methodical analysis of a single person, group, community, or other unit, in which the researcher investigates detailed data pertaining to a number of different factors;

This type of inquiry can be carried out on a community, for example. 2 Researchers explain how case studies investigate complicated occurrences in their natural environments in order to gain a better understanding of such occurrences. 3 4 Indeed, Sandelowski 5 argues that the holistic character of nursing care may be addressed by doing research that uses case studies.

[Citation needed] In addition, while explaining the procedures that are followed while utilizing a case study technique, this type of research enables the researcher to take a complicated and extensive topic, or phenomena, and limit it down into a more manageable research issue (s).

If the researcher were to gather only one sort of data on the phenomena, they would not receive the same level of insight into it as they would if they collected both qualitative and quantitative facts about the phenomenon. The examples that are included towards the conclusion of this article serve to exemplify this point.

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Quite frequently, there are several instances that are comparable to one another that need to be considered, such as educational or social service programs that are carried out in a number of different areas.

Although they are comparable, they are not the same and have distinct characteristics. The review of numerous examples that are comparable to one another will offer a better answer to a research issue under these conditions than the examination of just one case will, which is why a multiple-case study is being conducted.

What is the purpose of a case study?

Explain what a case study is. A case study is a method of research that is utilized to develop an in-depth, multi-faceted knowledge of a complicated topic in its real-life setting. This understanding is generated via the use of a case study. It is a tried-and-true method of study that has found widespread use across a wide range of academic fields, most notably in the social sciences.

  • A case study can be described in a number of different ways (Table 5), but the essential need is to investigate an occurrence or phenomena in great detail while situating it within its natural environment;

It is for this reason that it is frequently referred to as a “naturalistic” design; this is in contrast to a “experimental” design (such as a randomised controlled trial), in which the investigator aims to exercise control over and influence the variable(s) of interest.

What’s another term for case study?

What are some synonyms for the term case study?

dossier report
register documentation
chronicle annals
journal log
data diary

.

What are the 3 methods of case study?

What exactly is a case study, though? – A case study is a method of research that is used to develop an in-depth, multi-faceted knowledge of a complicated topic in its real-life setting. This information may then be utilized to make informed decisions about the issue.

It is a tried-and-true method of study that has found widespread use across a wide range of academic fields, most notably in the social sciences. A case study can be described in a number of different ways (Table 5), but the essential need is to investigate an occurrence or phenomena in great detail while situating it within its natural environment.

It is for this reason that it is frequently referred to as a “naturalistic” design; this is in contrast to a “experimental” design (such as a randomised controlled trial), in which the investigator aims to exercise control over and influence the variable(s) of interest.

  1. The many types of case studies are outlined in Table 5;
  2. The work of Stake has been especially helpful in the process of developing the case study method of conducting scientific inquiry;
  3. He has done a great service by characterizing the three primary categories of case studies, which are intrinsic, instrumental, and collective ;

In most cases, a person will do an intrinsic case study in order to get insight into a certain occurrence. The researcher has to explain what makes this phenomena different from all the others by identifying its distinctive characteristics. In contrast, an instrumental case study takes a specific scenario (some of which may be more compelling than others) and applies it to the purpose of gaining a deeper understanding of a problem or phenomena.

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When doing a collective case study, researchers look at numerous examples either all at once or one after the other in an effort to gain an even more comprehensive understanding of a specific topic. However, these categories do not always exclude one another from their scope.

In the first of our examples (Table 1), we initially planned to conduct an intrinsic case study to investigate the problem of recruiting people of minority ethnicities into the specific context of asthma research studies. However, as we sought to understand the problem of recruiting these marginalized populations more generally, the case study morphed into an instrumental case study.

As a result, it produced a number of findings that are potentially transferable to other disease contexts. In contrast, the other three examples (see Tables 2, 3, and 4) utilized collective case study designs in order to investigate the introduction of workforce reconfiguration in primary care, the implementation of electronic health records into hospitals, and to gain an understanding of the ways in which healthcare students learn about patient safety considerations [4, 5, 6].

Although our study, which focused on the implementation of General Practitioners with Specialist Interests (Table 2), was explicitly collective in its design (four different primary care organizations were studied), it was also instrumental due to the fact that this particular professional group was studied as an exemplar of the more general phenomenon of workforce redesign .

Why are case studies used in developing processes?

Case studies provide a number of advantages:

  • Information that is both thorough and rich in quality is provided.
  • This provides a foundation for further investigation.
  • Providing the ability to investigate issues that would otherwise be immoral or unfeasible.

Case studies provide researchers with the opportunity to explore a topic in a great deal more depth than would be feasible if they tried to deal with a big number of research participants (nomothetic technique) with the intention of ‘averaging’ their findings. Case studies, due to the comprehensive and multifaceted approach that they take, frequently shed light on elements of human thought and behavior that, if studied in any other method, would be immoral or impracticable to investigate. Research that focuses solely on the quantitative components of human behavior is not likely to provide any light on the subjective dimensions of experience, which are of utmost significance to psychoanalytic and humanistic schools of thought in psychology.

  • Case studies are frequently utilized throughout the exploratory research process;
  • They are able to inspire us to think about fresh thoughts (that might be tested by other methods);
  • They are an essential tool for illuminating ideas and may be of use in demonstrating how many parts of a person’s life are connected to one another;

Therefore, it is essential for psychologists to use this strategy, particularly those who take a holistic perspective (i. humanistic psychologists ).

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What is case study method of research?

What exactly is a case study, though? – A case study is a method of research that is used to develop an in-depth, multi-faceted knowledge of a complicated topic in its real-life setting. This information may then be utilized to make informed decisions about the issue.

It is a tried-and-true method of study that has found widespread use across a wide range of academic fields, most notably in the social sciences. A case study can be described in a number of different ways (Table 5), but the essential need is to investigate an occurrence or phenomena in great detail while situating it within its natural environment.

It is for this reason that it is frequently referred to as a “naturalistic” design; this is in contrast to a “experimental” design (such as a randomised controlled trial), in which the investigator aims to exercise control over and influence the variable(s) of interest.

  1. The many types of case studies are outlined in Table 5;
  2. The work of Stake has been especially helpful in the process of developing the case study method of conducting scientific inquiry;
  3. He has done a great service by characterizing the three primary categories of case studies, which are intrinsic, instrumental, and collective ;

In most cases, a person will do an intrinsic case study in order to get insight into a certain occurrence. The researcher has to explain what makes this phenomena different from all the others by identifying its distinctive characteristics. In contrast, an instrumental case study takes a specific scenario (some of which may be more compelling than others) and applies it to the purpose of gaining a deeper understanding of a problem or phenomena.

When doing a collective case study, researchers look at numerous examples either all at once or one after the other in an effort to gain an even more comprehensive understanding of a specific topic. However, these categories do not always exclude one another from their scope.

In the first of our examples (Table 1), we initially planned to conduct an intrinsic case study to investigate the problem of recruiting people of minority ethnicities into the specific context of asthma research studies. However, as we sought to understand the problem of recruiting these marginalized populations more generally, the case study morphed into an instrumental case study.

As a result, it produced a number of findings that are potentially transferable to other disease contexts. In contrast, the other three examples (see Tables 2, 3, and 4) utilized collective case study designs in order to investigate the introduction of workforce reconfiguration in primary care, the implementation of electronic health records into hospitals, and to gain an understanding of the ways in which healthcare students learn about patient safety considerations [4, 5, 6].

Although our study, which focused on the implementation of General Practitioners with Specialist Interests (Table 2), was explicitly collective in its design (four different primary care organizations were studied), it was also instrumental due to the fact that this particular professional group was studied as an exemplar of the more general phenomenon of workforce redesign .